Presented by the Designers Lighting Forum of New York

SAVE THE DATES! August 18–19, 2020

LEDucation 2020 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBIT HALL. Stay tuned for details!

2020 Seminars

Stay Tuned for 2020 Virtual Seminar Schedule and Updates to be held August 18–19, 2020

Design

Case Study

Human-centric

Controls

Code

Docent Tour

IoT/PoE/BT/Tech

Outdoor Lighting

Other

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Designing with Luminance and Exitance
Craig Bernecker, Parson School of Design, The New School

This session explores approaches to design using metrics other than illuminance, as well as several studies that make the case for exitance rather than illuminance for establishing the level of lighting in an environment. It will also demonstrate tools that can help analyze and assess luminance and exitance criteria from a pragmatic standpoint, demonstrating the use of some of these tools real-time. Finally, the session will illustrate how High Dynamic Range Imaging using digital photography and apps for cell phones and tablets can be incorporated for measuring luminance and exitance for commissioning a lighting system. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Specifying Color Rendering with TM-30's New Annex E
Jason Livingston, Studio T + L and Wendy Luedtke, ETC

This session presents the new ANSI/IES TM-30 Annexes E and F, which identify three color rendering design intents and provides specifiers with TM-30 values to achieve them alone or in combination. The goal of this presentation is to increase awareness of this newly published documents and to help attendees better understand their contents and use. This presentation is most appropriate for participants with some prior knowledge of TM-30, although a brief overview of TM-30 will be provided. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU HSW

Light and Health...And Energy Efficiency?
Robert Soler, BIOS Lighting

As we begin to understand that light does more than just support vision, "lighting what we want to see" becomes an antiquated philosophy. But how do we light for wellbeing with energy constraints becoming more stringent? This presentation will explore what additional design strategies we should strive for in the future, including a powerful visual effect known as color constancy. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION – Wireless, POE, or …BOTH?
Carol Jones, Axis Lighting; Dwight Stewart, Igor; and John Romano, Enlighted

Connected Lighting technology options thus far have been a patchwork of "either/or's," with little overlap or interoperability. This session will objectively cover the pros and cons of both POE and wireless solutions. We will provide a framework for actionable decisions about how to achieve the true spectrum of lighting design, configuration, and IoT project goals, for multiple stakeholders. The near-term future for hybrid systems and interoperability will be covered, offering hope for specifiers and clients who want the best of both options and future proof solutions that aren't restricted by specific brands.  More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

The World of Illusion vs. Allusion
Abhay Wadhwa and Justin Moench, AWA Lighting Designers

While exploring and analyzing design solutions, there is often an important distinction that needs to be made pre-facto. Shall we pursue options that allude to the architecture, or willfully create illusions that are superimposed on a willing architecture? Through this analysis arise two distinct visual worlds— a world of illusion or a world of allusion. The appropriate choice of direction for the project is then a mirror to the cultural and historical context, through the prism of illusion or allusion. We will present two projects, Soularium (as illusion) and Ismail Building (as allusion), highlighting and relating to real-life designing. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Drivers: Impossible. Your Mission...
Tom Shearer, Lutron and Kenneth Schutz, Focus Lighting

LED drivers are critical to the performance of LED lighting systems, and yet hardly anyone knows what they really do, or what is important to specify about them. All you need for better outcomes is to write a tight spec, to defend it, and some coordination. In this presentation, a lighting designer and an engineer will reveal all you need to know to write better specs, save time and heartache, and care for your designs and clients. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU HSW

PANEL DISCUSSION: What's The Deal with Healthy/Circadian/Human-Centric/WELL Lighting? And How Does It Impact Design?
Dorothy Underwood, KGM Architectural Lighting; Kassandra Gonzales, RAB Lighting and Lesa Lorusso, Gresham Smith

This course takes an overview of the various conversations, recommendations, and certifications around the idea of healthy lighting, and distills what the audience needs to know as an industry. The presentation will delve deeper into the science behind all these conversations to see where they come from, and where they overlap. Finally, the focus will shift to what everyone really wants to know: How does this affect us? What is the impact of healthy lighting for designers, manufacturers, clients, and end users? More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: The Evolution of Technology: Lighting the Veterans Room at the Park Avenue Armory
Dawn Ladd, Aurora Lampworks; Marija Brdarski, Herzog de Meuron; Paul Marantz, Fisher Marantz Stone; and Kirsten Reoch, Park Avenue Armory

The Veterans Room at the Park Avenue Armory is an extraordinary example of Gilded Age opulence in America. Completed in 1881 by Louis Comfort Tiffany, Stanford White, Candace Wheeler and Samuel Colman, the room was illuminated by decorative, hand-forged gas fixtures. Architect Marija Brdarski (Herzog de Meuron), designer Paul Marantz (Fisher Marantz Stone), and lighting restorer Dawn Ladd (Aurora Lampworks) will discuss how these fixtures were converted from gas to electric in the early 1900s and retrofitted to accept integrated LEDs during the room’s recent restoration. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU HSW

Decoding "Healthy Lighting" from a Designer's Perspective
Rebecca Mintz, Lightcraft

The word is out about “healthy lighting” and “circadian lighting.” Owners are coming to designers asking for it in their projects, but they don’t necessarily know what they are asking for. On the other hand, there is a lot of research being published about the impacts of light on health, but it isn’t easily accessible to designers (who don’t have lots of free time to read studies anyway). This presentation will review and evaluate the currently published research with the goal of educating designers to be able to make informed design decisions and advise clients responsibly. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

LED Fundamentals for Interior Designers
Charles Pavarini III, Pavarini Design

Geared to Interior Designers, it will provide an overview of LED technology. It will explain the pros/cons of LED’s as well as terms including Lumen output, Color Temperature (measured in degrees Kelvin), and CRI in order to identify their strength and coloration. Designed to help designers better understand how to utilize and specify LED technology, the course will reduce confusion in understanding LED Lighting Facts found on packaging and in specifications to give confidence in knowing how LED lighting can be integrated. It is essential for professionals to know about LED’s advantages and disadvantages as other lighting types are phasing-out. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: A Lighting Designer, a Component Engineer, and an Integrator Walk Into a Bar — DMX512 for LED Control in Architectural Applications
Shoshanna Segal, Luminous Flux; Steve Rose, Acuity Brands; and Nick Gonsman, ETC

Instead of the beginning of a bad joke, its a discussion about the who, the what, & the why (and even an occasional why not) involved in successfully specifying and using DMX-512 as a control method for architectural lighting design. We will talk about things you should know before you start, and things you need to make sure everyone else knows as well. We'll also try to dispel some of the stranger, fiction-based misconceptions around what can be a useful tool for controlling LED loads when used properly.  More >

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

The Future is Here: How Virtual Reality (VR) Helps Lighting Designers Make Better Design Decisions
Shahrzad Abtahi, Lightcraft

Virtual Reality (VR) is not a wow factor to amaze clients anymore, it’s a design tool to minimize RFIs, errors and documentation time, and maximize time and efficiency. As lighting designers, we deal with rapid advances in lighting technology, but that should not stop us from experimenting with VR in our daily design routines. By reviewing case studies in this presentation, attendees will learn about different types of VR and will be introduced to benefits that VR offers to lighting designers. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU HSW

PANEL DISCUSSION: Lighting for Outdoor Pedestrian Spaces
Nancy Clanton, Clanton & Associates Engineering; Naomi Miller, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Randy Burkett, Randy Burkett Lighting Design, Inc. and Shirley Coyle, Cree

There is a new IES Lighting Practice document in town, with art, appearance, environment, reassurance, and comfort in its soul. This workshop will take you through the design recommendations that are unique to pedestrian areas in parks, civic squares, along waterways, in plazas, restaurants, areas around sports fields, and sculpture gardens. Focal points, color, safety, visibility of others, consideration for critters, minimizing intrusive light and skyglow — all these issues are covered in a practical yet poetic way. The members of the committee will guide you through the recommendations, illustrative photos, and supportive tables. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Lighting Design: Bridging the Gap between LEED and WELL
Reiko Kagawa LC, LEED AP, BD+C, Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting

Lighting is a major component to achieve LEED and WELL. If the correct approach is taken from early stages of planning and design both standards can work hand-in -hand. While LEED focuses on environmental sustainability and WELL focuses on a building occupants’ wellbeing, there are parameters the team must understand and follow to create a truly sustainable building. This session includes an introduction to WELL V2 and compares and contrasts lighting design criteria for LEED and WELL. Bridging the gap between the two can elevate your current and future projects to be environmentally responsible and mindful of human health benefits. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

From RFQ to Copyright: Light Art Lessons Learned
Glenn Shrum, Flux Studio Ltd.

From RFQ to programming, this talk will share the full process of a site-specific light artwork that evokes the powerful and enigmatic nature of fireworks. Located at a liberal arts college, Radiant Echo features 286 reflective orbs and 3,640 programmable LED pixels that display a series of dynamic sequences. Creative content draws on diverse areas of study as informed by a workshop with College community. Documentation of the process and finished work will illustrate lessons learned about artistic intent, LED system components and business issues encountered while realizing a permanent light art installation. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Designers Befriend a Researcher
Andrea Wilkerson, Ph.D., LC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Katherine Stekr, CLD, IALD, MIES, E, HLB Lighting and Rachel Fitzgerald, CLD, IALD, LC, Stantec

Our industry is ever evolving; from current technologies and luminaire advances to stricter energy codes. Yet most of the metrics we use as lighting designers haven’t evolved much over recent decades. Why is that? A team of lighting designers and a researcher will engage in a point/counter-point discussion about the gaps that inevitably occur between current research and the reality of applying it in design applications. They will explore several research topics with detailed case studies, evaluating what research data tell us and discussing why and what type of metrics are most needed for designers. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU HSW

New Developments in Emergency Lighting Control
Mitch Hefter, Signify and Steve Terry, ETC

New additions to the 2020 NEC and UL924 standard mean new possibilities and requirements for the design of a compliant emergency control system. In addition, new technologies such as Power Over Ethernet emergency systems must be designed in a compliant manner. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Lighting and Media: A Convergence Conversation
Jeanne Angel, Local Projects; Shaun Fillion, NYSID|RAB Lighting; Shan Jiang, Tillotson Design Associates; and Matthew Schreiber, Schreiber Studios

As technology progresses and becomes more accessible and scalable, trends are in evidence which merge the digital and architectural spaces. Light, video and soundscapes are harnessed to redefine the relationship between occupant and space.

In this new world, what distinguishes between designing architectural lighting and designing narrative light? What common language can be established for collaboration, when architectural space is augmented by media? How do we work together to tell the story of a space? This seminar will leave participants with a better sense of the narrative storytelling and cross-platform collaboration and design. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Project Management from a Woman's Perspective
Andrea Hartranft, Hartranft Lighting Design; Kelly Roberts, WALD Studio; Robin Charlick, Lehrer Cumming; Shayna Bramley, Stantec; and Robert Bazan, Chelsea Lighting

Join the Women in Lighting and Design roundtable as we discuss navigating project management from design development through commissioning. At this roundtable we’ll discuss our unique experiences, from finding a seat at the table with architects, engineers and developers to maneuvering the construction site with contractors and distributors. We’ll explore how to build a project powerhouse team, how to avoid pitfalls, and how to strengthen your voice as a woman from any field in the design and construction industry. This session welcomes and encourages all lighting industry professionals to participate, regardless of your role, sex, or profession. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

PoE Lighting - Ins and Outs
Bill Ellis, Candela Controls

This seminar will leave participants with an understanding of what Power over Ethernet (PoE) means in its practical uses in today’s and future lighting systems. Explore both the hardware and software needs of the system from the design of a system, the selection of components, through the installation needs in the field to allow for better understanding of this new and engaging technology for lighting control. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

LED Lighting Design Essentials
Eileen M.E. Pierce, Pierce Lighting Studio

This session will help attendees learn lighting design basics for thoughtful and successful design integration of LED lighting specifications and dimming controls. More >

TM-30 Demonstration Room
Jason Livingston, Studio T+L , Wendy Luedtke, ETC and Jess Baker, Shuler Shook

What do the three TM-30 Annex E Design Intents mean in real life? In the TM-30 Demo Room visitors will experience immersive mockups illuminated with a variety of light sources illustrating the various design intents (Fidelity, Preference, and Vividness). These live lighting demonstrations will be paired with TM-30 values to show how TM-30 can be used to select light sources for each intent. Visitors will experience sources that meet different specification levels of the IES TM-30 specification guidelines outlined in IES TM-30-18 Annex E. More >

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Decorative Lighting in a SSL World
Dirk Zylstra, TLG Acuity Brands and Francois Renaud, Eureka Lighting (An Acuity Brands Co.)

The role of decorative lighting is evolving with the advent of Solid-State lighting. From colorful, decorative elements to fully functional architectural IoT devices, we will explore the fixture design process as it has evolved in the last 10 years and finish with a discussion on how we can best serve the lighting, interior and architectural design communities with relevant and innovative lighting. More >

Advanced
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Lighting Controls — By Others?
C. Webster Marsh, Horton Lees Brogden; Carl Camenisch, CC & A International; Chuck Cameron, Stan Deutsch Associates; Gary Dulanski, The Dulanski Group; Paula Martinez-Nobles, Fisher Marantz Stone; Shaun Fillion, NYSID|Rab Lighting

A panel discussion of how technology and user expectations have changed the process of designing lighting controls. How often does this phrase appear in contract documents for projects, and how do we collaborate to realize the goals of the design? Our panel considers lighting control scope from the initial narrative, to whole building networking, to individual luminaire controls and what happens between drivers and the LEDs that they control. This scaled approach will focus on the teamwork involved in turning on and tuning a light in a connected building. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Transforming the Game-Time Experience: LED Sports Lighting and DMX Controls Case Studies
Christy Rogers, EwingCole; Dan Nichols, Diversified and Richard Garman, EwingCole

When combined, LED sports lighting and DMX control systems can create an immersive, elevated game-time experience through dynamic lighting shows. We’ll review the methods and strategies that elevate the fan experience to major league status, including new LED sources. We will discuss DMX control system design, techniques for developing programming content and communicating design goals with end users. Discussions will include design, budgetary constraints, integration, programming, commissioning, and training including how these issues evolve throughout the course of large-scale projects. Case studies will include the recently completed updates to Philadelphia Phillies’ Citizens Bank Park and the Villanova Wildcats’ Finneran Pavilion. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU HSW

Light Art for the Masses
Golsana Heshmati, The Seed and Maria Dautant, CD+M Lighting Group

He’e Nalu is a light art installation inspired by waves, that was presented at the Sydney Botanical Gardens, as part of Vivid Sydney in 2018. This case study explores the challenges and successes of designing and producing an original and interactive light art piece, suitable for outdoors, for one of the largest light festivals in the World.

This presentation will tell the story of how both NYC lighting designers – Golsana Heshmati and Maria Dautant – were able to overcome the distance and create an experience that allows a person to “ride” a wave of light and sound. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU HSW

PANEL DISCUSSION: Compassionate Lighting for the Future Urban Night
Francesca Bastianini, Sighte Studio; Alex Pappas-Kalber, Sighte Studio; Jane Slade, Speclines; and Shaun Fillion, NYSID|Rab Lighting

By 2050, two-thirds of the world population will reside in cities. The life of a city does not stop at dusk, but continues through the night. Lighting establishes an identity for the city skyline that can unite residents and drive tourism. Yet if improperly applied, lighting can blanket the surrounding landscape with light pollution, impacting both natural ecosystems and the well-being of the population. Our panel will discuss current studies on light's impact on biology, look at lighting as part of a city's identity, and formulate action plans for municipalities to shape a compassionate night experience for all city life. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Stretch Codes Putting a Squeeze? Energy Code Yoga and Updates
Harold Jepsen, Legrand/Wattstopper and Marty Salzberg, NYSID

New York State and New York City have adopted more efficient energy codes, including stretch code requirements in NYC, mandated by NYC Local Laws. This course will provide both an overview, and specific details on the impact on lighting and control project designs. The codes are based on IECC 2018 and ASHRAE 90.1-2016, which are also being adopted by neighboring states. NYC is going further through Local Laws and incorporating the new NY Stretch code. This course reviews these code changes, shares compliance helps and looks to coming future energy code trends. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Take Me to the Bridge
Graham Whittaker, Zumtobel Group

Before we focus on the bridge, we should focus on the light and what light bring to bridges and their surrounding space, whether that is a built up urban space or a simple woodland - Lighting can turn spaces into experiences.

By using the captivating power of light we can change the way people see and react to bridges in context with the environments and space around them. By lighting a significant structure such as a bridge we can make the normal interesting, we begin to make icons iconic. More >

 

Intermediate
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Integration and Commissioning: Design Team Coordination and Best Practices
Jonathan Dillard, Lighting Services Inc.; Patrick Kisling, SLS Controls; Bobby Baines, EOS Lightmedia and Ted Mather, Available Light

It’s increasingly necessary to have a complete and detailed commissioning/integration scope in order to ensure projects are completed on time without delays or additional costs. The purpose of this panel is to explore the information needed to be communicated between end-users, designers, and engineers to ensure a design is accomplished as intended.

The panel will consist of designers, reps, and integrators who will discuss the issues they’ve encountered, the solutions and lessons learned. The end goal is to discuss where each part of the project can be improved to ensure the customer receives a complete and sustainable design. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1 AIA LU

Specifying LED Lighting for Residential Projects
Stephen D. Bernstein, Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design

Specifying lighting for residential projects has become very complicated. Selections must be made based on color, color consistency, tunable white, dim-to-warm, colored lighting. Add to the mix, issues with retrofit lamps, dimming and dimming protocols and associated cost implications, the choices can make the design team's head explode!

This talk will outline the different choices available and discuss the pros and cons for each item. It will give a designer a way to approach specifying lighting that is appropriate for their clients' needs, aesthetically, functionally and financially. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: Wireless Control Systems: If Only You Could Get Them to Work
Craig Bernecker, Parson School of Design, The New School; Dan Blitzer, Practical Lighting Workshop; Ruth Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Melanie Taylor, WSP

Controls can do so much. If only you could get them to work! The Next Generation Lighting Systems Living Lab in New York is working to realize the promise of simpler, more economical wireless lighting control systems.

This seminar takes on challenges of specifying, installing, and configuring these systems so they deliver the results you want. Common issues with wireless controls will be address, offering approaches gleaned from experiences at the Living Lab, including recently installed systems. Since many problems begin with the specification, examples of how to a document desired performance will be discussed.  More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU

PANEL DISCUSSION: How to Light Historic Interiors

Francesca Bettridge, Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design; J. Bunton, Apicella + Bunton Architects; and Philip Koether, Philip Koether Architects

Lighting for historic spaces is more than replacing outmoded lighting technologies with LEDs. The designer can make a significant impact on how the architecture is read and how people interact with these spaces.
For the Manuscripts and Archives Renovation at the Yale Sterling Memorial Library, we increased the light levels, revealed architectural detailing that was heretofore unnoticed, and retained the historic character of a space without adding visible architectural fixtures to the rooms.
In the second project, Kips Bay Towers by I.M. Pei, we worked collaboratively with the architect and property managers to create solutions that struck the right balance between modernization and keeping the integrity of the original design, which had remained untouched since its construction in 1960. More >

 

Introductory
Credits: 1.5 AIA LU HSW

PANEL DISCUSSION: Improving the Wellness of Spaces Through Lighting and Acoustics
Katheryn Czub, Fisher Marantz Stone; Marc Sutton, LucePlan and Megan Carroll, New York Digital

There are extensive positive health, social, and financial benefits to the design of spaces with good lighting & acoustics. They decrease negative physiological & psychological states while increasing positive behavioral and cognitive functions. Spaces with proper lighting & acoustical design not only increase wellness - they also result in spaces to connect, care, and create. The panel will discuss why acoustics have become such a large design issue, why acoustical lighting has become such a popular solution, and how to evaluate an acoustical lights efficiency. More >

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